7.8.13- 7.18.13

From Atlantic Cities via StreetsBlog LA:

That’s Right, Los Angeles Is Giving Up Car Lanes for Pedestrians

“Los Angeles has a great deal of walkability despite its car-centric reputation, but much of it remains hidden to the public. In the city’s historic Broadway corridor, at least, that secret is about to come out. The city council recently voted to fund an initial redevelopment of Broadway into a legitimate pedestrian plaza — reducing six lanes of road down to three in the process.”

http://www.theatlanticcities.com/jobs-and-economy/2013/07/s-right-los-angeles-giving-car-lanes-pedestrians/6116/

From LA Business Journal:

Forecast: Slow, Steady Economic Growth for L.A.

“L.A. County’s economy will continue its broad but frustratingly slow improvement during the rest of this year and into next year, according to a regional forecast to be released Wednesday.”

http://www.labusinessjournal.com/news/2013/jul/17/forecast-slow-steady-economic-growth-l/

From DC StreetsBlog via LA StreetsBlog:

TDP Debuts a LEED-Type Rating System for Transit-Oriented Development

“Last week, the Institute for Transportation & Development Policy released the first draft of a new scoring system that should help identify what really deserves to be called transit-oriented development and what is merely car-centric development pretending to be TOD. ITDP hopes the system will function as an international standard for transit-oriented development — a LEED for TOD, if you will — much like the organization’s standard for bus rapid transit.”

http://dc.streetsblog.org/2013/07/15/itdp-debuts-a-leed-type-rating-system-for-transit-oriented-development/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+streetsblogla+%28Streetsblog+LA%29

From The Atlantic Cities:

Streets Can Be Public Spaces Too

“A growing segment of the market is ready for more urban environments, but for young urbanites to remain committed to city living and more walkable suburban environments as their life circumstances evolve, they will need higher quality urban places than we have offered in the recent past; and they will need relief from the sometimes harshness that unmitigated density can bring. It is the urban commons – the parks, plazas, streets, greenery and public facilities we share or in which we have a collective interest – that have the greatest potential to provide these things.”

http://www.theatlanticcities.com/design/2013/07/streets-can-be-public-spaces-too/6235/

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The Warner Center Association creates and enhances opportunities and fosters programs for the benefit of Warner Center's business and property owners, and all stakeholders. WCA advocates for pro-business public policies, particularly those affecting land use and business incentives in the Warner Center community.